Home     Back to forums     Login
Album list     Last uploads     Last comments     Most viewed     Top rated     My Favorites     Search
Home > User galleries > icefoglights > HID Lights
Click to view full size image

Westinghouse Wallguard

Here is a Westinghouse Wallguard mercury vapor security light. The lens is badly yellowed, but it does have one. Most of these that have been seen in use are missing their lenses. It's held on fairly well, using 4 screws, one at each apex, which are partially covered by the rubber gasket wrapped around the edges. Unfortunately the bottom lens screw is seized and the head is stripped. I was able to open it up enough to see a Westinghouse deluxe white cleartop lamp inside, though I wasn't able to date it. It could be original.

IMG_2673.JPG IMG_2703.JPG IMG_2668.JPG IMG_2671.JPG IMG_0426.JPG
File information
Filename:IMG_2668.JPG
Album name:icefoglights / HID Lights
Keywords:Misc_Fixtures
Company and Date Manufactured:Westinghouse Electric Corp.
Model Number:WG 175-R-120
Wattage:175
Lamp Type:Mercury Vapor
Filesize:229 KiB
Date added:Dec 19, 2011
Dimensions:1024 x 1365 pixels
Displayed:199 times
Color Space:sRGB
DateTime Original:2011:12:16 17:57:09
Exposure Bias:0 EV
Exposure Mode:0
Exposure Time:1/60 sec
FNumber:f/2.6
Flash:Red Eye, Compulsory Flash
Focal length:5.8 mm
Make:Canon
Max Aperture:f/2.6
Model:Canon PowerShot A540
URL:http://www.galleryoflights.org/mb/gallery/displayimage.php?pid=9945
Favorites:Add to Favorites

Comment 3 to 22 of 22
Page: 1 - 2

Form109   [Dec 20, 2011 at 04:46 AM]
Form109
the lense is browned over area's that are Phosphored as well...the area that's clear isn't big enough to cause all that browning.

icefoglights   [Dec 20, 2011 at 05:34 AM]
icefoglights
I think it has more to do with heat than UV. The browned areas start at the bottom of the bulge of the lamp, with an area where the lamp is closest to the lens actually being slightly melted, and the browning fading further away from that point. Though the browning isn't as severe at the top of the lens, heat collecting at the top did cause some browning to happen.

The neck of the lamp is also clear, yet there is no browning aligned with this area.

streetlight98   [Dec 20, 2011 at 11:14 AM]
streetlight98
I likely has to do with heat. Heat rises, so the top of the refractor was damaged by it. Notice how it gets worse and worse as you go closer to the highest point in the refractor... I just find it odd how it wasn't more gradual. It could very well be a combination of heat and the clear part of the lamp...

GullWhiz   [Dec 20, 2011 at 03:32 PM]
GullWhiz
What is the numbers on the lamp, also do you see the date code on the ballast? There may actually be a date code on the capacitor...95% of the time I find the date on the capacitor!

streetlight98   [Dec 20, 2011 at 08:45 PM]
streetlight98
Can we get a side shot of this? Very Happy

joe_347V   [Dec 20, 2011 at 09:49 PM]
joe_347V
Here you go, and here's another one but with the refractor missing.

streetlight98   [Dec 20, 2011 at 10:00 PM]
streetlight98
Thanks. These sure are oddballs, but still have a nice old fashioned look that no wall pack today has.

joe_347V   [Dec 20, 2011 at 10:04 PM]
joe_347V
Hmm I always thought they were more of a floodlight instead of a wallpack, but they do have refractors like a wallpack. Maybe wallflood is good name for this? Razz

streetlight98   [Dec 20, 2011 at 10:08 PM]
streetlight98
Ehh. I don't consider this a flood since it's designed for wall mount. I'd liek to see Cooper start making this! Shocked It'd probably be Cooperized thoguh. Crying or Very sad Rolling Eyes Mad

joe_347V   [Dec 20, 2011 at 10:13 PM]
joe_347V
I don't know, the layout and shape of this luminaire screams floodlight to me.

GullWhiz   [Dec 20, 2011 at 10:43 PM]
GullWhiz
Westinghouse calls it the "Wallguard" that's the actual name of it.....so it could be a Floodlight Wall Pack....but floods usually (even older ones) have clear glass......

Now now, Mike and Joe, I know you both like to go back and forth on comments, but I would like to see a bit less of that...ain't a chat room here....

icefoglights   [Dec 24, 2011 at 08:33 AM]
icefoglights
Bad news. The cap failed and took the ballast with it. What a mess! Fortunately the lamp survived.

GullWhiz   [Dec 24, 2011 at 02:52 PM]
GullWhiz
Ouch!!!

don   [Dec 24, 2011 at 11:32 PM]
don
Sometimes when a cap fails, it's not obvious. On a 175w MH ballast, the line current jumps up causing rapid over-heating of the coil while the lamp looks normal...at least for the one I experimented on. A line fuse rated just slightly higher than the normal max current might be the best safe-guard.

GullWhiz   [Dec 24, 2011 at 11:34 PM]
GullWhiz
Don what is the best way to prevent those things, would a GFCI or AFCI or overload protection or even fuse help prevent killing a ballast if the cap was bad?

TiCoune66   [Dec 25, 2011 at 12:26 AM]
TiCoune66
I guess a 3AG or 8AG fuse would be the best protection here. Those are the little ones made of glass (or ceramic for higher capacity ratings).

joe_347V   [Dec 25, 2011 at 12:40 AM]
joe_347V
Just wondering do HID ballasts have built in protection? I was under the impression that they do not...at least for the core and coil type.

I guess a inline fuse would be a good idea then, I actually use them on older fluorescent ballasts.

don   [Dec 25, 2011 at 01:16 AM]
don
Nowadays, caps are protected from shorting out. They either lose capacitance....which will save ballast (but under-drive lamp) or go open I think. I'm not sure what kind of fuses work best though.

joe_347V   [Dec 25, 2011 at 02:09 AM]
joe_347V
@don, I noticed that too, the newer caps all say that they are protected on them.

I've noticed that there are recommended fuse amperages on Advance's spec sheets (sample).

SeanB~1   [Dec 25, 2011 at 06:26 AM]
SeanB~1
Best would be to place a 130C non resettable or manual reset thermal fuse in the windings ( and insulate it well as it has the full mains on it) to sense overheating. I have seen this on small wall wart transformers often. This, along with a slow blow fuse at the next rating over the startup or line current of the ballast, placed in a place where it is not exposed to the heat of the ballast or lamp ( fuse ratings decrease as temp increases, so it will blow if placed too close and the ambient gets hot) will prevent the ballast going crispy, though it can still develop a short circuit, but will not burn up.


Comment 3 to 22 of 22
Page: 1 - 2