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August 01, 2015, 06:10:44 PM

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Home > Public Albums > User galleries > Coolcat97 > Street Lighting
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The base of the Underbraced Upsweep pole that's holding the ITT 125 I posted awhile back
Rusting of course. And the cover's open too. Lovely.
2011-04-23_21-44-51_797.jpg 2011-04-23_21-44-51_797.jpg SAM_0402.JPG upload1.JPG misc.jpg
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Filename:SAM_0402.JPG
Album name:Coolcat97 / Street Lighting
Keywords:American_Streetlights
File Size:405 KB
Date added:23 Jul 2015
Dimensions:1696 x 954 pixels
Displayed:35 times
Colour Space:sRGB
Contrast:0
Date Time:2014:02:16 16:42:42
DateTime Original:2014:02:16 16:42:42
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Exposure Program:Program
Exposure Time:1/135 sec
FNumber:f 3.4
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Focal length:2.1 mm
ISO:50
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Make:SAMSUNG
Max Aperture:f 3.9
URL:http://www.galleryoflights.org/mb/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-19661
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Form109
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Form109  [26 Jul 2015 at 20:16]

i love when the wiring in the Pole fails and they run new wire externally....i've seen that alot.

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streetlight98  [26 Jul 2015 at 23:08]

Yeah they could just dig a hole around the pole where the existing wire enters and then cut the old conduit and connect the new conduit to the remaining stub of old conduit. Afterall, they have to dig to do it this way too and by doing what I suggested, it saved from drilling a hole and having an exposed conduit. Looks better when everything is concealed.

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Dat LPS...

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joe_347V  [29 Jul 2015 at 05:28]

Heh, I've seen that a lot around here too. Even some freeway lights are wired up like this.

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streetlight98  [29 Jul 2015 at 08:56]

Ahh our freeway lighting has manholes next to each pole where the splices for the pole are made. I think there's also a fuse or breaker in there too. The hand holes in the pole are not used by RIDOT or NGrid for freeway poles. So if there's a wiring issue, they just replace the cable running from the manhole to the top of the pole and whatever else is wrong. No exterior conduit.

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joe_347V  [01 Aug 2015 at 05:38]

Our lights downtown are wired up like that but I believe poles in suburban areas and freeways have the conduit going straight to the handhole where the splices are made.

The older freeway poles have short transformer bases with handholes but I don't think they were ever used for splices.

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streetlight98  [01 Aug 2015 at 12:01]

RI is one of the few states I know that doesn't use transformer base freeway poles. MassDOT and CDOT use transformer bases, IIRC New Hampshire DOT does too. RIDOT and NGrid use breakaway couplings instead, which look better IMO. Transformer base only looks good if the pole has a remote ballast fixture with the ballast in the base.

Anyway, before the breakaway couplings came out, RIDOT and BVE/NECo/NGrid poles simply had no breakaway base; they were just bolted right to the foundation. In the mid-80s and 90s, NECo used direct-bury poles in some development neighborhoods when those high-end housing developments started becoming the new "thing". I believe they were concrete. The lights used with these were mainly 100W HPS M-250R2 FCOs and 150W HPS Model 113 FCOs (very very rare; NECo never used 150W HPS except for a few of these FCO 150W 113s and an even smaller number of drop lens 80s 113s). 150W must have been a test pilot thing for NECo in the 80s. NGrid doesn't service them. When a 150W HPS light fails, it's replaced with 100W HPS, sometimes I've even seen them get replaced with 250W HPS, on a residential street. In fact, this whole neighborhood from the late 80s is lit by 250W HPS M-250R2s! There's one 1990s 100W HPS M-250R2 mixed in, probably a replacement. The first light to the neighborhood is on a wood pole and it's a late-80s M-250R2 too, but it's 100W HPS FCO. In the mid-late 80s, NECo must have used FCO for 100W HPS M-250R2s and drop lens for 250W HPS and 100/175W MV M-250R2s. I've seen one 70W late 80s M-250R2 and it's drop lens with a glass. See here. In the pic, it has its original lamp and PC. It has been relamped since 2011 though. It's the only 70W HPS in that area and the only 70W M-250R2 I know of in NECo territory. They didn't start using 50W HPS until the early-mid 90s changeout. There's very few 70W HPS lights in NECo territory. They were still installing mostly 100W MVs as the lowest wattage instead of HPS until the 90s.

Here's one of those 150W HPS Model 113 FCOs on one of those direct bury poles. Once its lamp dies, a 100W HPS M-250R2 will take its place. Two more. And here's one of those 100W HPS FCO M-250R2s.



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